The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING | CONTACT US|

» » »

Stem Cells for Pancreatic Cancer Nashua NH

New research is moving scientists closer to their goal of treating pancreatic cancer by killing tumors without hurting healthy tissue. The researchers, who were scheduled to report their findings at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress, Oct. 11-15 in Chicago, have created a bioengineered "construct" that uses stem cells derived from bone marrow and a genetic product that stops tumor growth.

Dr.John Jerome Posner
(603) 880-3408
166 Kinsley Street #302
Nashua, NH
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll
Year of Graduation: 1968
Speciality
Oncologist
General Information
Hospital: St. Josephs
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.6, out of 5 based on 5, reviews.

Data Provided by:
John Jerome Posner, MD
(603) 880-3408
166 Kinsley St Ste 202
Nashua, NH
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided by:
Dr.Mary Voltz
(603) 880-3408
172 Kinsley Street
Nashua, NH
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ma Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 1984
Speciality
Oncologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Astrid Olga Peterson, MD
(978) 683-9209
295 Varnum Ave
Lowell, MA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology, Diagnostic Radiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Boston Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02118
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: Lowell General Hospital, Lowell, Ma
Group Practice: New England Radiation Therapy

Data Provided by:
Kimberly A Brennan
(978) 937-6258
295 Varnum Ave
Lowell, MA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Douglas Tisdale
(603) 880-3408
172 Kinsley St
Nashua, NH
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
James Dennis O'Shea, MD
(603) 886-7900
10 Prospect St Ste 202
Nashua, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Ronald Peter Mc Caffrey, MD
(978) 937-6421
295 Varnum Ave
Lowell, MA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Murat Anamur
(978) 937-6650
295 Varnum Ave
Lowell, MA
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Blair Ardman
(978) 937-6650
295 Varnum Ave
Lowell, MA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Stem Cells for Pancreatic Cancer

Provided By:

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- New research is moving scientists closer to their goal of treating pancreatic cancer by killing tumors without hurting healthy tissue.

The researchers, who were scheduled to report their findings at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress, Oct. 11-15 in Chicago, have created a bioengineered "construct" that uses stem cells derived from bone marrow and a genetic product that stops tumor growth.

Pancreatic cancer requires stem cells in order to grow. The "Trojan horse" created by the researchers essentially confuses cancer cells and makes them produce a toxic product.

The findings could in time lead to better treatments for pancreatic cancer, which is often fatal. According to the National Cancer Institute, 43,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with the disease each year, and 35,000 people die.

"The prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer is so devastating that even a small effect on prolongation and quality of life would be a tremendous outcome for the patient," study author Dr. Claudius Conrad of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, said in a news release from the American College of Surgeons.

One currently available treatment is chemotherapy, but it can make healthy cells become sick and can cause a variety of side effects, including bowel damage, diarrhea and nausea.

"We developed our concept of using stem cells to target tumor cells because the homing drive of aggressive tumors like pancreatic cancer is so strong that genetically engineered stem cells can help destroy the tumor," Conrad explained. "Also, the unique signals in the tumor microenvironment can help make the therapy cancer-specific once the modified stem cells have been homed."

To date, the research is still in preliminary stages and has been tested only in animals.

More information

Learn more about pancreatic cancer from the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

SOURCE: American College of Surgeons, news release, Oct. 14, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com

®2010 Hippo Press. site by wedu