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Nicotine Receptors Could Be Lung Cancer Treatment Target Manchester NH

In a study of mice with lung cancer, a treatment that targeted nicotine receptors more than doubled the animals' survival time, a research in Manchester suggests. Nicotine plays a dual role in lung cancer. Changes in genes encoding nicotine receptors not only drive the urge the smoke, but also increase susceptibility to lung cancer.

Thomas Andrew Sheldon, MD
(603) 669-5300
1 Elliot Way
Manchester, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1980
Hospital
Hospital: Elliot Hosp, Manchester, Nh
Group Practice: New Hampshire Medical Lab

Data Provided by:
Brian Robert Knab
(603) 663-1800
1 Elliot Way
Manchester, NH
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
Karen Jane Hoffmeister
(603) 629-1827
100 Hitchcock Way
Manchester, NH
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Peter Holland Crow, MD
(603) 622-6484
200 Technology Dr
Hooksett, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Columbia Univ Coll Of Physicians And Surgeons, New York Ny 10032
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Robert J Friedlander Jr, MD
(603) 622-6484
200 Technology Dr
Hooksett, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1981
Hospital
Hospital: Elliot Hosp, Manchester, Nh; Lakes Region General Hospital, Laconia, Nh
Group Practice: New Hampshire Oncology

Data Provided by:
Donald Raabe Weiss, MD
(603) 663-1800
1 Elliot Way
Manchester, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Languages
Other
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1965
Hospital
Hospital: St Joseph Hospital And Trauma, Nashua, Nh; Elliot Hosp, Manchester, Nh; Concord Hosp, Concord, Nh; Wentworth-Douglass Hospital, Dover, Nh; Exeter Hosp, Exeter, Nh
Group Practice: Elliot Regional Cancer Ctr

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Charles George Leutzinger, MD
(603) 628-1800
1 Elliot Way
Manchester, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ct Sch Of Med, Farmington Ct 06032
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Jack Terry Evjy, MD
(978) 685-7811
21 Bowman Parade Rd
Bedford, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Hematology-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Boston Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02118
Graduation Year: 1961
Hospital
Hospital: Holy Family Hosp And Med Ctr, Methuen, Ma
Group Practice: Commonwealth Hematology-Onclgy

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Meredith J Selleck
(603) 622-6484
200 Technology Dr
Hooksett, NH
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Charles Howard Catcher, MD
(603) 622-6484
200 Technology Dr
Hooksett, NH
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Elliot Hosp, Manchester, Nh; Concord Hosp, Concord, Nh
Group Practice: New Hampshire Oncology-Hmtlgy

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Nicotine Receptors Could Be Lung Cancer Treatment Target

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MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- In a study of mice with lung cancer, a treatment that targeted nicotine receptors more than doubled the animals' survival time, Italian researchers say.

Nicotine plays a dual role in lung cancer. Changes in genes encoding nicotine receptors not only drive the urge the smoke, but also increase susceptibility to lung cancer. Exposure to nicotine boosts the expression of nicotine receptors, which leads to increased cell proliferation and inhibits the programmed cell death known as apoptosis.

In the new study, published in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the compound α-CbT dampened the expression of nicotine receptors and increased apoptosis, prolonging the lives of the mice.

"This research clearly has profound clinical implications regarding the role of nicotine in stimulating lung cancer and nicotine receptor antagonists in treating the disease," said Dr. John Heffner, past president of the American Thoracic Society, in a news release from the society. Heffner, who was not involved in the research, added, "The highly addictive nature of nicotine, however, complicates patients' ability to quit smoking and avoid ongoing nicotine exposure."

Previous research has shown that it's possible to dampen the response of nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) using an antagonist called d-tubocurarine/α-Cobratoxin (α-CbT), which specifically targeted the area most linked to increased cell growth.

In the study, researchers grafted human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) onto the lungs of mice and then delayed treatment, allowing the tumors to become well-established.

The mice were then divided into three groups: the untreated group; the standard chemotherapy drug group; and the α-CbT group.

Mice that were categorized as non-obese/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) and treated with cisplatin (the standard chemotherapy agent) were found to have a 16 percent longer median survival time than untreated mice. NOD/SCID mice treated with α-CbT had an increased median survival time of 1.7-fold over the cisplatin-treated mice and 2.1-fold over untreated mice.

"The results of this study show that α-CbT, a powerful, high-affinity α-7-nAChR inhibitor, induces antitumor activity against NSCLC by triggering apoptosis," wrote Patrizia Russo of the Lung Cancer Unit of the National Cancer Research Institute in Genoa, Italy, in the news release.

Noncancerous cells did not appear to be affected by α-CbT, suggesting limited toxicity, the researchers found, but they noted that cancer cells with the most receptor binding sites seemed have the greatest treatment sensitivity.

"The goal of this research line is to explore the widest range of possibilities of intervention on the α7-nAChRs," Russo said. "We hope to move further on towards the clinical setting experimentation phase for the assessment of potentially new treatment strategies for NSCLC."

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on non-small-cell lung cancer.

SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, June 15, 2009

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