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Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Before Birth Affects DNA Nashua NH

Women who smoke while pregnant increase their unborn child's long-term risk for health problems, including childhood asthma, cardiovascular disease and lower pulmonary function, and a new study may help experts understand why.

Cynthia Ann Rasmussen
(603) 577-3170
10 Prospect St
Nashua, NH
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

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Denise Dawn Mc Hugh, MD
(603) 881-8500
10 Prospect St
Nashua, NH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1992

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Mark Alexander Conway, MD
(603) 883-3365
460 Amherst St
Nashua, NH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1989

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Dr.Cynthia Rasmussen
(603) 577-3170
10 Prospect St # 402
Nashua, NH
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Pa
Year of Graduation: 1981
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Gregory W Kaupp
(603) 889-2847
280 Main St
Nashua, NH
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pediatric Internist

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Dr.Melissa Martinez-Adorno
(603) 577-3100
10 Prospect St # 303
Nashua, NH
Gender
F
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
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Hospital: WomanS Care Clinic
Accepting New Patients: Yes
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5.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

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Dr.Denise McHugh
(603) 881-8500
10 Prospect St # 402
Nashua, NH
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ
Year of Graduation: 1992
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Hospital: snhmc
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.6, out of 5 based on 10, reviews.

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Dr.Valerie Bell
(603) 577-4300
21 East Hollis Street
Nashua, NH
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Vt Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1999
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Karen Kay Maynard, MD
(603) 577-3100
19 Tyler St Ste 103
Nashua, NH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1994

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Susan Eileen White, MD
(603) 594-2547
460 Amherst St
Nashua, NH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1983

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Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Before Birth Affects DNA

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MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women who smoke while pregnant increase their unborn child's long-term risk for health problems, including childhood asthma, cardiovascular disease and lower pulmonary function, and a new study may help experts understand why.

Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) found that maternal smoking actually changes the unborn child's DNA patterns.

The new study found that fetal exposure to maternal smoking was linked to differences in DNA methylation, an epigenetic mechanism.

Epigenetics is the study of how chemicals that attach to DNA can switch genes on and off, which leads to differences in gene expression without changing basic genetic information, according to background information in a USC news release about the study.

While epigenetics plays a role in cancer research, little is known about how epigenetic changes may be caused by environmental exposures.

In the new study, the researchers used data from the USC Children's Health Study, which examined respiratory health among children in 13 Southern California communities, as well as information from a questionnaire on maternal smoking exposure. The findings are reported in the September issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

"This study provides some of the first evidence that in-utero environmental exposures such as tobacco smoke may be associated with epigenetic changes," said one of the lead authors, Carrie Breton, assistant professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. "This could open up a new way for researchers to investigate biological mechanisms that might explain known health effects associated with maternal smoking," she stated in the news release.

"Moms should not be smoking during pregnancy," Linda Birnbaum, director of the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, said in the news release. "Maternal smoking during pregnancy is not only detrimental to the health of the mom and the newborn child, but research such as this suggests that it may impact the child into adulthood and possibly even future generations as well."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on smoking while pregnant.

SOURCE: University of Southern California, news release, Aug. 27, 2009

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