The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING | CONTACT US|

» » »

Correcting Toddler Behavior Nashua NH

The following article offers tips for correcting bad toddler behavior. Although it may seem alarming, behaviors, such as biting and hitting, are natural developments in young babies and children.

Dr. Carl Hindy
Carl G. Hindy, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist
(603) 880-8773
120 Main Street
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: Ph.D.
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Life Transitions, Men's Issues, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Caregivers, Step Families, Gifted, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Maureen Guilfoyle
Maureen V. Guilfoyle LICSW
(603) 554-6198
5 Northern Blvd. Unit 1604
Amherst, NH
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Sexual Orientation, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Caregivers, Step Families, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Anne Clancy
(617) 462-2682
139 Billerica Rd. Suite C-2East
Chelmsford, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
35 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interp
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Caregivers, Chronic Illness
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Valerie MacKenzie
Valerie MacKenzie, LICSW
(978) 851-9550
1565 Main St Building 2 Suite 206
Tewksbury, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
20 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Women's Issues, Postpartum Depression
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Lise Knakkergaard
(978) 771-2917
One Elm Square, Suite 2A
Andover, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
20 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Penni Kaufman
Penni M. Kaufman, MSW
(603) 882-2115
120 Main St. Suite 105
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Obsessive/Compulsive Disor
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Step Families, Gifted
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Karen Short
Karen Short
(978) 266-9100
270 Littleton Road Unit 31
Westford, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Phobias, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Psychosomatic, Women's Issues
Populations Served
College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Diane Franciose-Webber
(888) 655-2268
P. O. Box 2023
Littleton, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Parenting Issues, Phobias, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Stress, Trau
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Caregivers, Step Families, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Mark Burton
MARK S. BURTON, LICSW, Licensed Psychotherapist
(978) 470-4975
21 Central Street
Andover, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Learning Disabilities, Multicultural Is
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), AIDS/HIV+, Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Transgendered, Military/Veterans, Twins, Disabled, Immigrants/Refugees, Sensory Impaired (hearing, vision, etc), Caregivers, Step Families, Gifted, Chronic Illness,
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Josephine Bottone
Northb Bridge Psychological Assoc. LLC
(978) 264-4003
525 Main Street
Acton, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Correcting Toddler Behavior

provided by: 

Shocking as it may be, aggressive behaviors, such as biting, hitting, and throwing things are a normal part of your toddler's development. It is a part of a child learning self-control. Usually, toddlers phase out of bad behaviors by age four. Still-emerging language skills, a fierce desire to become independent, and undeveloped impulse control make children this age prime candidates for getting physical. That doesn't mean you should ignore it, of course. Let your toddler know that aggressive behavior is unacceptable and show him other ways to express his feelings.

Biting

While it is crucial to accept the premise that biting is an age-appropriate behavior for toddlers, it is just as important to accept that biting is not an acceptable behavior. Adults must help toddlers control their urge to bite other children by responding quickly and firmly.

First, the biting child should be stopped with a firm no!. At the same time that the adult speaks, the adult should act. Ideally, one adult steps in to help the victim while another stops the biting child. Where this is not possible, the biting child should usually be dealt with first. Discipline for toddlers is most effective when it occurs immediately after the unacceptable action. The biting child should be removed from the situation in the form of redirection of attention or time-out.

Preventing biting before it happens is better than dealing with it after it occurs. Consequently, adults should carefully observe the moods and needs of toddlers. When a child is exhibiting low tolerance for frustration, or when a child has a history of biting, or when a child is teething, adults must pay especially close attention to the potential-biting child.

Hitting

Toddlers are fascinated with what they can make happen over and over and they are also curious about how people react in different situations. Hitting people satisfies both of these interests. Furthermore, toddlers see the world only from their own point of view and therefore dont understand that other people have different ideas and feelings than they do.

Don't be afraid to let your child know you are angry. Use it as a teaching moment. You are not trying to frighten or browbeat the child into submission. You are trying to express anger constructively, so your child will know how it's managed.

1. Stop the physical aggression immediately. If your child has hit you, don't let him/her hit you repeatedly. Grip their wrist firmly, and say with equal firmness, "No hitting. You do not hit me. You can be angry, but you may not hit."

2. Expect compliance. Do not let go of the wrist until you can feel the tension leave the child. If you misjudge, and they swing at you again when you let go, repeat the step above, and hold longer. Wait for him/her to relax. Repeat your words. Keep this up for as long as it takes. Be gentle, be firm, but be unyielding.

3. When they begin to relax, praise/encourage them.

4. When the child is no longer coiled to strike, praise them again. Give, and receive, a hug with the child. This is not letting them away with it. They need to know it's all right to be angry, that they can be angry, they can express it in other ways, and that they're still loved, even if they experience anger.

5. Quickly move on to the next thing.

Remember, that just as your child has the right to expect you to treat them respectfully, you have the right to be treated respectfully by your child. If this is your consistent response, you will greatly reduce or even entirely eliminate hitting in a matter of weeks.

When Your Toddler Says No

Saying the word no is a necessary part of being a toddler. Kids this age are driven by the need to make their own decisions, to be autonomous, and to control their world, and the way they express these needs is through the word no. If you're the parent of a toddler, you'll hear it morning, noon, and night.
Don't try to talk your little one out of it, and don't forbid it. No is not optional. Kids this age can be worked with, however. If you encourage their feelings of autonomy and power, you'll lessen the number of no's in your family. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Give your child choices so she feels a sense of control over her world. Apple juice or carrot juice? Would you like me to help you into your stroller, or do you want to do it yourself?
  • Encourage independence by letting them do things for themselves, and setting up their environment so they can. This may mean putting toys in bins, keeping cups for water on low shelves, putting stools near sinks, and generally making your home more child-friendly. Enroll your child as your assistant. Let your child be a participant in family work and she'll feel needed and powerful in her ability to help.
  • Don't expect your child to always be nice, and don't take her no personally. Your child is not defiant, angry, or negative-she's a toddler saying no.

When Your Toddler Throws Things

Toddlers are delighted by cause-and-effect relationships. By dropping and throwing objects, your budding scientist is discovering gravity just as Sir Isaac Newton did some 300 years ago. Spoons clatter, cups crash, but Cheerios make almost no sound at all. Each of these revelations is magical to your little one. Part of his delight comes from being able to relive the discovery over and over. Here's what to keep in mind so you survive this stage:

He's not acting out. Your pitcher-in-training's predilection for tossing is not an act of defiance or aggression. Sometimes it's your preverbal toddler's only means of communication. An empty sippy cup thrown on the floor could mean he's still thirsty and wants more. Become attuned to what's being thrown and you might learn to better understand his needs.

You can set limits. Tell him what may and may not be thrown (balls good, food bad), and where throwing is okay, preferably outdoors and not from his high chair. Gently say "No throwing," and shake your head firmly with a serious look on your face. If he persists, tell him: "If you want to throw, I'll take you out of the high chair and we'll go in the backyard and play catch." Then follow through. As long as you're calm and consistent, he will learn.

All toddlers will exhibit all of these inappropriate behaviors, so do not feel like you are alone. Your toddler is beginning to express himself, show independence, and experiment with limits. Your job is to redirect the behavior, and show him that these bad behaviors are not appropriate and will not be tolerated. With time, patience, and by following through your toddler will eventually outgrow this phase.


Author: Danielle Haines

Click here to read rest of the article

®2010 Hippo Press. site by wedu